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Burning Spear News

In Case You Missed It, the 2017 Marcus Garvey Legacy Cruise

Mar 7, 2018
Ekenge Mayele and Diakiesse Lungisani

The 2017 Marcus Garvey Legacy Cruise took place from December 9-16, 2017.  The supporters and friends of the Uhuru Movement sailed aboard the Carnival Glory for a seven day, six night exotic Caribbean cruise. 

The places visited this year were Half Moon Cay–Bahamas, Nassau-Bahamas, Amber Cove-Dominican Republic and Grand Turk in the Turks and Caicos Islands.

This event was the fifth cruise fundraiser for the African Socialist International.

This year’s cruisers hailed from St. Louis, MO, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, DC and St. Petersburg, FL and included Zaki Baruti, President General of the Universal African People’s Organization, along with other members of his organization.

A last minute change to our itinerary along with devastating hurricanes prohibited us from sailing our originally scheduled course to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, which ultimately lead to a smaller number than usual for this year’s cruise, but everyone had a “revolutionary” good time.

Half Moon Cay -Bahamas was our first stop. Many of our participants stayed aboard the ship due to the inclement weather while the excursions were cancelled as well.

The weather improved greatly once we arrived to Nassau-Bahamas where we were greeted by Chairman Alex Morley of the African People’s Socialist Party Bahamas and Comrade Charo Morley, who led us on a magnificent tour of the island. Here, we visited parliament square, also known as Rawson Square.

Beyond being the meeting place for public and government officials, this area is also infamously known to be where the “bike lane shuffle” began.

Dating back to early slavery, Africans in great numbers would be huddled together, shackled as they “shuffle” in a circle before a prison where they would be locked away. This same process continues today. 

We also visited a library that, during slavery, held African slaves which is now filled with library books. 

From there, we visited Straw Market, where we shopped ‘til we dropped!

In the market, there was beautiful handmade jewelry, hand-woven purses and African clothing galore!

An extra highlight of the tour was visiting the Pompey Museum of Slavery and Emancipation!

The building dates back to around the 1760s when the facility was used as a market, from which commodities of all kinds, including Africans, were sold.

The Pompey Museum is named for Pompey, a slave who raised a revolt on The Bahamian Island of Exuma.

The historian Christopher Davis gave a magnificent presentation that had each of us captivated.

Amber Cove in the Dominican Republic was the next stop upon the cruise, but due to the persecution and murder of Africans from Haiti by Africans located in the Dominican Republic, most participants chose not to explore the island, including the Chairman. 

Lastly, we visited Grand Turk and Caicos Islands. Upon getting off the ship, you are met with immense wealth, shops, and tourists busily moving all about.

Once you make your way outside of the tourist area, you are met with the harsh reality of what it means to be an African living in any part of this earth. 

Most had never been witness to “shanty towns” or seeing the poor makeup of the communities inhabited by these Africans.

What was most striking was that the island was still recovering from hurricanes previous to Hurricane Irma.

Like all of the other islands, there is poor infrastructure and hardly any protection from the sea that is merely feet away from deficiently-built homes.

Grand Turks and Caicos Islands are still pledged to the British, having everything from groceries and supplies imported into the island.

One gallon of milk cost at least $11 while gas is at $6 per gallon.

Chairman Omali Yeshitela provided several riveting political education studies while on board that were not only attended by supporters and members of the Uhuru Movement, but passengers we met while on board.

Covering many topics including why he become a Revolutionary, the contradictions faced by Africans living in the Dominican Republic and African identity, he clearly laid out the history and  importance of the African Socialist International and why revolution is the only true way to free Africans of this colonial existence.

Another of the most exciting highlights of our cruise was when our own, Black Power 96.3 FM Station Director, Diakiesse Lungisani, showed off his talent and won the on board Lip Sync Contest that was viewed by thousands of cruisers aboard the Carnival Glory! 

You can find his winning performance on his Facebook page. If you haven’t seen it, check it out.

A big Uhuru and Thank You to Comrades Charo and Alex Morley of the African People’s Socialist Party Nassau, Bahamas and to our sponsors Johnny X, Pop Lancaster, Jackson Hollingsworth, Rene Nassar, Johann Bedingfield and all of the African Socialist International.

In the coming weeks we will be preparing for the 2018 Marcus Garvey Legacy Cruise. Make sure to check for the announcement!

 

 

 

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